Voracious Deep-Sea Squid

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The film captured the squid, Taningia danae, in action: 1 The squid swims towards the bait; 2 It spreads its arms wide; 3 It swims around the bait, twisting its body; 4 It grabs the bait with its eight arms.

The last few days have been hell! My happy Intel Mac is sick and I have been computerless until this afternoon. If that hasn’t been enought there are crazy bioluminescent squid lurking in the deep and everyone covers it before me. Our streak of reporting deep-sea news before everyone else died today. With a tear in my eye, I say sorry.

But back to crazy squid! The Japanese do it again and capture a squid on video. This time is Taningia danae a pelagic squid. (~55-900m). Interesting thing about T. danae, other than bioluminescence, is that as adults both tentacles are lost. The tips of arms II are broadened and contain photophores that can be covered with protective lid. They can get quite large, up to 1.7m for the mantle length. The videos are excellent and show the individual swimming and attacking bate.

Dr. M (1801 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.