Friday Deep-Sea Picture (03/02/07)


From MBARI: When MBARI researchers explore the seafloor below 1,000 meters, the most common fishes they see are rattail fish such as this Coryphaenoides acrolepis, which was photographed in Monterey Canyon. Rattails are are very curious and will come to investigate any disturbance on or around the seafloor. Presumably this helps them find food in the darkness of the deep sea. Rattail fish are caught and sold under the more palatable name, “grenadier.” However, the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program recommends that consumers do not purchase or eat grenadier because the fish grow very slowly and may not reproduce until they are 30 or 40 years old.

Dr. M (1729 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Assistant Director of Science for the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, a National Science Foundation supported initiative. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (, a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web. His forthcoming book, Science of the South (, connects cultural icons of South such as pecan pie with the science behind them.

3 comments on “Friday Deep-Sea Picture (03/02/07)
  1. … while the giant squid, thought to be a mythological creature, was documented by Japanese researchers [ in 2004 ].

    Sigh… How long have carcasses been washing up on beaches?

  2. Oh bloody Thor! The previous comment was meant to be for the Irovy Bill Woodpecker vs. Giant Squid posting. Apologies for clicking on the wrong link.

  3. Pingback: NE Pacific Expedition Day 6 & 7 | Deep Sea News

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