Claiming The Polar Seabed

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From the Moscow Times…

Two deep-sea submersibles made a test dive in polar waters Sunday ahead of a mission to be the first to reach the seabed under the North Pole. It took an hour for Mir-1 and Mir-2, each carrying one pilot, to reach the seabed at a depth of 1,311 meters, 87 kilometers north of Russia’s northernmost archipelago, Franz Josef Land in the Barents Sea, Itar-Tass reported. “It was the first time a submersible had worked under the icecap and it proved they can do this,” Anatoly Sagalevich, the pilot of Mir-1 was quoted as saying by Itar-Tass as he left the sub….The mission involves a nuclear-powered icebreaker clearing a path to the Pole for the expedition’s flagship Akademik Fyodorov. This will launch the submersibles to scoop samples from the seabed for research. The mission will also plant a flag on the seabed under the Pole to claim the territory symbolically for Russia.

Dr. M (1801 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.