Me On TV…Kind Of

Christina Kellogg invited me to give a seminar at the joint USGS/University of Southern Florida College of Marine Science. Overall I think the talk went well, but you can be the judge. You can view the whole talk about seamounts here in all of its glory (warning the file size is very large). Viewing it reminded me of Robert de Niro’s statement “I don’t like to watch my own movies – I fall asleep in my own movies.” When I worked at my college radio station, which I enjoyed thoroughly, I never listened to the broadcast later. The radio gig always left me puzzled by how I sounded and viewing the talk is that combined with me asking “I look like that?”

You can be the judge of whether its better than this.

Dr. M (1755 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.


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4 comments on “Me On TV…Kind Of
  1. .” When I worked at my college radio station, which I enjoyed thoroughly, I never listened to the broadcast later. The radio gig always left me puzzled by how I sounded and viewing the talk is that combined with me asking “I look like that?”

    It’s nice you have some media background. I have a couple of years in PR work, radio and TV interviews and I think we need more scientists not only going public with colleagues, but with the public. I have a new program called, We can make you a famous scientist, and from what I have heard, there is a big demand from the public wanting to know more about science ASAP!
    Keep up the great work!
    Dave Briggs :~)

  2. It’s nice you have some media background. I have a couple of years in PR work, radio and TV interviews and I think we need more scientists not only going public with colleagues, but with the public.

  3. It’s nice you have some media background. I have a couple of years in PR work, radio and TV interviews and I think we need more scientists not only going public with colleagues, but with the public.

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