More Cosmeceutical Nonsense

Apparently that slime trail left behind by snails and slugs is good for the skin.

The studies have verified that the dribble of snail allows to prevent and to eliminate wrinkles, to attenuate grooves, to eliminate scars caused for wounded and burns of first degree, to remove the acne, to clean spots produced by the sun. It has also demonstrated to be effective to eliminate warts of the skin.

But will my hair grown back on my bald head if I rub a snail on it. The real question is how to they harvest it.

Unbeknownst to me a Chilean company AGROINDUSTRIAL LA FLORESTA LTD is dedicated to the production and exportation of ‘soil’ snail, Helix aspersa Müller. Being the raising of snails our principal target we have split our production in the elaboration of high quality slime:SNAIL SECRETION FILTRATE or cryptosina, used as raw material for dermatologic and cosmetic products widely recognized.

You can read more at the Gimcrack Hospital.

Dr. M (1801 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.


3 Replies to “More Cosmeceutical Nonsense”

  1. The studies have verified that the dribble of snail allows to prevent and to eliminate wrinkles, to attenuate grooves, to eliminate scars caused for wounded and burns of first degree, to remove the acne, to clean spots produced by the sun. It has also demonstrated to be effective to eliminate warts of the skin.

    It sounds fantastic, but I hope they get a PR firm to work on the name! LOL! Trying to persuade someone to smear snail dribble on their person may be rougher than it seems! LOL!
    Dave Briggs :~)

  2. Hmm… I’ve heard the same claims made about bull semen. Apparently women from a tribe in somewhere in Africa smear it all over their face to look young.

    My wife says that one of the main ingredients in many “beauty” products is urea btw.

Comments are closed.