In the Future, We Live on Glorified Cruise Ships

The Blue Economy points to a supplement in The Guardian about “Cities at Sea”. They depict the Lilypad cities in addition to homes that rise and fall with river flood levels in the Netherlands (see story in der Spiegel). One other project, meant for the open ocean, is the Freedom Ship.

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Originally designed as a floating city capable of housing up to 60,000 residents, it ran into financial trouble in 2002. 3,000 people had signed up to live aboard in what was advertised to be a

“luxurious “endless retirement cruise”, free of taxes and government pressures”. But the idea has been reborn as an answer to rising sea levels. Whether any of these often fantastical schemes get beyond the drawing board remains to be seen.”

Think this sounds like a grand idea? Then check out the residential listings. Or perhaps you want to capitalize on this opportunity of getting thousands of wealthy cruise-ship retirees (or global warming refugees) together in one place and open up a store. Think this might be a tax dodge or an attempt to create a new country? Let founder Norman Nixon put your fears to rest in the FAQ.

I wonder if Freedom Fries will be served on the Freedom Ship? All Aboard!

Dr. M (1801 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.


9 Replies to “In the Future, We Live on Glorified Cruise Ships”

  1. It’s a parking garage.

    Unless I’m meeting deep throat to exchange inside ocean information, I’ll take the lilly pad or the buoy before this thing.

  2. Let’s let it get to full occupancy and then sink it.

    Mother nature may beat you to it. Does anybody know how to make a ship 3 times as long as the largest supertanker, that won’t break apart when ocean waves high-center it? For that matter, does anybody know how to maintain public health on a ship that size? Existing cruise ships carrying one-tenth as many passengers sometimes have outbreaks. And four-hour firewalls make it “virtually fireproof”?

    Truly, a boring disaster movie waiting to happen.

  3. Decrepit Old Fool FTW!

    The Lilypads are way more aesthetic, which will be important if we are to live our lives on it! Of course the same sociological and psychological issues from the Lilypad City thread are relevant here as well.

  4. Anyone else remember this ‘Freedom Ship’ stuff when watching Wall-E?

    Living on the blue-water ocean is a lot like living in the arctic (or antarctic)… there may be some good reasons why a few people need to be out there, but it isn’t someplace to move to unless there is a damn good reason to be there.

  5. lol, yeah i read that too and thought it was hilarious. I wonder if that financial aide got the same email I got from the Nigerians….

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