Octopods On Blow

In December 2007, Portuguese police confiscated 9.4 tons of cocaine in a shipment of frozen octopus from Venezuela. “I suppose it’s possible that someone defrosted the animals, took out the cocaine, then threw their bodies overboard”

Even more disturbing is it is more likely a parasite, bacteria or virus.

Dr. M (1730 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Assistant Director of Science for the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, a National Science Foundation supported initiative. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web. His forthcoming book, Science of the South (http://www.scienceofthesouth.com/), connects cultural icons of South such as pecan pie with the science behind them.

3 comments on “Octopods On Blow
  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Octopods On Blow | Deep Sea News -- Topsy.com

  2. FWIW, the best theory I’ve heard so far on the Portuguese octopus washup was neither drugs nor disease, but salinity change due to freshwater runoff from rains. Dr. James Wood at the Aquarium of the Pacific pointed out that cephalopods are uniquely bad at dealing with osmotic stress and mentioned similar die-offs in Hawaii after large rains.

Comments are closed.