Who do I pick to ride in my sub? Ice-Cube or T-Pain

When I’m chillin’ in my underwater low low, I want to attract attention.  I can’t be doing that in some rusted out old tin can.  Sequester and budget cuts be damned!  Nope I going for the cheery red C-Explorer 5.  Me and 4 of my posse (Alex, Holly, Kim and of course T-Pain, sorry Al and Rick not enough room for more dudes) can roll right.   With a 300 meter depth rating, standard air conditioning, and 43.2 kWH Li-ion battery as standard, I’m set for 16 hours of straight bottom time.  The full 360-degree acrylic pressure hull allows us to see who may be riding up on us trying to catch us ridin dirty.  At a super fast 3 knots they better not even try.  Want to see more specs? You know you do. No word about hydraulic, drop top options, or how I could afford it.Screen Shot 2013-04-16 at 5.01.55 PM

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Dr. M (1729 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Assistant Director of Science for the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, a National Science Foundation supported initiative. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web. His forthcoming book, Science of the South (http://www.scienceofthesouth.com/), connects cultural icons of South such as pecan pie with the science behind them.

3 comments on “Who do I pick to ride in my sub? Ice-Cube or T-Pain
  1. Quick…someone call Xzibit. We need him to pimp our ride. I want disco lights….oh and and a slurpy machine.

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