6 times an invertebrate punched a vertebrate in the face (and it was awesome)

A guest post from Katie Thomas, a graduate student at Duke University researching the evolution of bioluminescence in squids. (@katiethomas10)

For those of us who love the spineless weirdoes of the ocean, it can get old always hearing about the dolphins and the whales, the sharks and the fish and the turtles that everyone loves so much (and that have a disproportionate representation in our culture: just think of all that Lisa Frank swag from the nineties).

Yes, that’s a young Mila Kunis with her Lisa Frank dolphin. But where is the Lisa Frank siphonophore?

Yes, that’s a young Mila Kunis with her Lisa Frank dolphin. But where is the Lisa Frank siphonophore?

Fellow invert nerds, please enjoy these gifs of invertebrates punching vertebrates in the face.

1. Giant isopod vs. shark

KCAFrvc - Imgur

You’ll never look at your backyard pill bug the same way again.

2. Bobbit worm vs. fish

Not exactly in the face, but it’ll get there eventually.

Not exactly in the face, but it’ll get there eventually.

 

3. Giant Pacific octopus vs. shark

Aquarium brawl

Aquarium brawl

4. Mantis shrimp vs. fish

Don’t mess with a mantis shrimp. Stabby stabby.

Don’t mess with a mantis shrimp. Stabby stabby.

5. Sea stars and nemerteans vs. seal

Ok, not exactly punching in the face, but eating the face which is just as awesome. Nom nom.

Ok, not exactly punching in the face, but eating the face which is just as awesome. Nom nom.

6. Octopus vs. cat

Octopus vs Cat - Imgur

Dr. M (1765 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.


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