TGIF: Barnacles put a ring on it

barnacle_mready

Have you ever seen the bottom of a barnacle? Or to be totally accurate, the top? I hadn’t either until a good friend and photographer, Michael Ready, showed me this photo he took in down in Baja California. There is just something about it, that I find absolutely stunning. Similar to annual growth rings found in trees, barnacles have growth rings as well. These concentric rings that represent cyclic growth periods are called ecdysal lines (also known as cuticular slips) and are associated with barnacle molting.

For more on Mike’s work photographing the natural world, please visit: www.michaelready.com 

Alex Warneke (112 Posts)

Alex is committed to a life of inspiring others to view science through a more dynamic and empowering lens. Alex obtained her M.Sc. in Chemical Ecology from San Diego State University and most recently resided as a Science Programs Manager and Marine Scientist for the National Park Service. As an ecologist, storyteller, and community engager, she has spanned critical boundaries between stakeholders in education, academia, non-profit, and government to translate the most current scientific bodies of work in ways that are accessible and inclusive. She is a strong proponent of unconventional science communication and extending the broader impacts of science to the public using the outlets of art, digital media, education, and citizen science. Currently, Alex works at the interface of climate resilience and community with the Climate Science Alliance. As Deputy Director for the Alliance, her hope is that through her work and experience she can get the world to think differently about how we connect and impact the thriving ecosystem around us and commit to fostering a more resilient future.