Words fail me for this title

Much has changed in the last weeks. Indeed, things have been changing for the last year.  No matter which way your sentiments fall, we can all recognize this. To me, the world seems smaller, hateful, and less hopeful. This is supposed to be the post that changes all of that. A call to arms. A verbal warm embrace. I sit here at the helm of this online community, unsure and not sure what I can offer the voice that people want and need right now.

I have tried to live my life by a few basic principles:.

  • The world needs more love and less hate.
  • Give of myself completely.
  • Be passionate and convey that passion to others.
  • Always seek truth even when it confronts your view of the world.
  • Always offer help and admit when you need it.

I hope over the years my actions here and elsewhere have reflected this. These pieces are reflected in our DSN core values. Now more than ever, words have power. It is time to turn these words into action.

Today, Deep Sea News comes back strong with renewed vigor and promise of the making of a different tomorrow. Each of the marine scientists here, Alex, Douglas, Holly, Kim, Rebecca, and I, have re-pledged ourselves to DSN. As always, our posts will be firmly rooted in science. Sometimes our posts will be critical. Others will be humorous as we seek laughter around us. Others will simply remind you of the beauty and awe in the world. Most importantly, DSN is safe place. All are welcome if coming with open minds and hearts.  

I have invited prior contributors and writers back to DSN. Their diversity in knowledge and their voices empower us. In diversity comes resilience. If you are a marine scientist and want to contribute a post a month, come join us here at DSN.

I am hopeful my words here have reached you in some small way.  That somewhere in the words above, which cannot come close to capture what weighs on my heart and mind, you find some meaning, some hope, some inspiration. However, as always I cannot do this alone. I continue to be supported by an amazing team. With our combined voices we are more complete. And through the renewed bonds of science, humanity and friendship, we will continue to be a voice for the ocean.

Dr. M (1774 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Executive Director of the Lousiana University Marine Consortium. He has conducted deep-sea research for 20 years and published over 50 papers in the area. He has participated in and led dozens of oceanographic expeditions taken him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses on how energy drives the biology of marine invertebrates from individuals to ecosystems, specifically, seeking to uncover how organisms are adapted to different levels of carbon availability, i.e. food, and how this determines the kinds and number of species in different parts of the oceans. Additionally, Craig is obsessed with the size of things. Sometimes this translated into actually scientific research. Craig’s research has been featured on National Public Radio, Discovery Channel, Fox News, National Geographic and ABC News. In addition to his scientific research, Craig also advocates the need for scientists to connect with the public and is the founder and chief editor of the acclaimed Deep-Sea News (http://deepseanews.com/), a popular ocean-themed blog that has won numerous awards. His writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.


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3 comments on “Words fail me for this title
  1. Thank you for your post and warm words. As an environmental biologist I have been closing my eyes and cringing since the election. I do realize, however, that it is time to be an “adult” and unfurl from my fetal position of denial. Hopefully if we all join together and support one another as scientists, we can get through the next four years with our sanity intact.

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