These are a few of my favorite species: Anything with an instrument on it

As a physical oceanographer I have a love-hate relationship with sea life. Ocean biology is totally cool….until it interferes with my measurements. I’m looking at you barnacles on my ADCP.

But swimming animals that can measure where oceanographers fear to tread, I am ALL OVER THAT. So here’s my favorite species…the ones I can stick instruments/tracking devices on.

THIS WEDDELL SEAL.

No one measures the temperature, conductivity and pressure of the Southern Ocean with so much style.

ENVY my jaunty head CTD.

ENVY my jaunty head CTD.

THIS PENGUIN WITH A BACKPACK.

Before there was the iWatch, there was a Penguin with a backpack monitoring its vital signs.

Thankfully, today's penguin health monitoring technology has gotten smaller.

Breaking all the style rules with duct tape flair.

THIS TRACKABLE TURTLE HATCHLING.

OH HAI turtle hatchling with a nanoacoustic tracking tag. I am sure tracking “frenzy” swimming from the beach where you hatched to deep water resulted in the most adorable science ever.

CAN’T. CONTAIN. THE. SQUEE.

THIS PORPOISE WITH A PURPOSE.

To spy on you protect America. Just adding another entry to the jerk list. (And yes, I know that is really a dolphin. And it is duty-bound to defend my first amendment right to use incorrect nomenclature for dramatic alliteration to the death.)

No seaside vacation is safe from dolphins.

No seaside vacation is safe from dolphins.

DEH NARWHALS.

While they may have lost to Elephant Seals in an epic battle for total ocean domination, I still love their deep diving, Baffin Bay temperature tracking ways.

THE WALRUS AND THE HOCKY PUCK.

Walruses. They smell. They snort. They have inappropriately tiny, red beady eyes. We love them nonetheless and track their every move from the sea ice, to the haulout on an Alaskan barrier island to Russia and beyond.

Larry had the nagging sense something was on his back.

Larry couldn’t shake the feeling that something or someone was watching his every move.

Dr. Martini (153 Posts)

Kim is a Senior Oceanographer at Sea-Bird Scientific. She received her Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Washington in 2010. Her goal in life is to throw expensive s**t in the ocean. When not at sea, she has used observations from moored, satellite and land-based instruments to understand the pathways that wind and tidal energy take from large (internal tides) to small scales (turbulence). Her current mission is to make your oceanographic data be the best data it can be.


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